Building example problem

lucatony wrote on Thursday, March 09, 2017:

I have some issues getting the example project (Blink / AnalogRead) to work. While the project works with the Arduino IDE, it doesn’t work with ArduinoMakefile (https://github.com/WeAreLeka/Arduino-Makefile/) , neither with inotool (http://inotool.org/). Although those 2 tools work fine with Arduino Basic projects (Blink…).

Compiling and flashing doesn’t give any errors. Any idea why freertos isn’t working with those tools ?

rtel wrote on Thursday, March 09, 2017:

No, sorry, you lost me, I’ve never used those tools.

lucatony wrote on Thursday, March 09, 2017:

Is there a possibility to develop RTOS for an Arduino without ArduinoIDE ? because it’s really a pain.

dibosco wrote on Thursday, March 09, 2017:

Probably. What is the processor/dev board you are using? As far as I know there are lots of different Arduino boards.

lucatony wrote on Thursday, March 09, 2017:

It’s the Arduino Uno. The strange thing is, that a standard project of Arduino (like Blink) works perfectly, but as soon as i use freertos it doesn’t work anymore, although it finds all dependencies and compiles…

dibosco wrote on Thursday, March 09, 2017:

Which is the Mega 328?

http://www.freertos.org/a00098.html

This is for the 323, there is a thread here about the differences:

http://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/freertos-atmega328-p-port

So, looks like IAR or WinAVR, which I think is gcc, so I guess would work under Atmel Studio if you’re unfortunate enough to use Windows.

The one thing I don’t know, though, is whether the JTAG interface comes out on these Arduino boards or whether you’re forced to use some on-board USB debug interface which might be an issue.

lucatony wrote on Thursday, March 09, 2017:

Yes atmega328p. I’m on Linux and flashing via USB. It should be the right FreeRTOS, because the Blink_AnalogRead example works with ArduinoIDE… and the makefile should use the same parameters.

dibosco wrote on Thursday, March 09, 2017:

Ah, OK. Having dug into a bit more it looks like you’re not using any debug interface, just flashing the chip and running blind (apart from maybe some printf functions to provide basic debugging).

Did you actually read that AVR freaks thread I sent? I think that’s your best bet.

I’m really not sure why you think just because something compiles and loads it should work. That sounds sarcastic and it’s not meant to be. I may well be missing something. Again, to return to the AVR freaks, it talks about possibly needing a different timer set-up between 323 and 328 - do you look into this? I’m also not clear where you got this Arduino FreeRTOS demo.

Are you just wanting to learn FreeRTOS or do you have a specific project that has to use the Mega328?

lucatony wrote on Friday, March 10, 2017:

Yes I read both articles, but I couldn’t get it working nonetheless.
The library I’m using is https://github.com/feilipu/Arduino_FreeRTOS_Library which should be compatible with the 328p.
But in general, I just want to program some tasks/threads without using the ArduinoIDE. I tried with eclipse but the AVR plugin doesn’t show me any MCU types (which seems a common problem).

I have a uni project but time is getting short now, you know how it is…

tlafleur wrote on Friday, March 10, 2017:

Due to the very limited amount of ram memory in the 328, it usefulness as a
host for freeRtos is extremely limited…

You may want to seek a processor like the SAMD21d used in the Arduino zero.

On Thu, Mar 9, 2017 at 11:39 PM luca lucatony@users.sf.net wrote:

Yes I read both articles, but I couldn’t get it working nonetheless.
The library I’m using is
https://github.com/feilipu/Arduino_FreeRTOS_Library which should be
compatible with the 328p.
But in general, I just want to program some tasks/threads without using
the ArduinoIDE. I tried with eclipse but the AVR plugin doesn’t show me any
MCU types (which seems a common problem).

I have a uni project but time is getting short now, you know how it is…

Building example problem
https://sourceforge.net/p/freertos/discussion/382005/thread/445011cf/?limit=25#fba6

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dibosco wrote on Friday, March 10, 2017:

You haven’t really said whether it has to be a Mega328 you use for this project.

If not (as you are using Linux)…

…I use Linux 99% of the time and use FreeRTOS a LOT in my job. I have a number of projects that work with Rowley Crossworks (that runs natively on Linux). If you can afford $150 for a licence and get a JTAG interface (Rowley’s Crossconnect works like a dream on Linux), you can get something like an Olimex board for, say, an STM32F103 (Olimex also do debugger interfaces for about €50 - which I haven’t tried) and have a really good project that will just work. This will give you proper debugging with breakpoints and register, memory watches etc.

Also, you can get a free 30-day licence for it to try it.

There is this board:

http://cpc.farnell.com/stmicroelectronics/nucleo-f103rb/nucleo-board-stm32f103rbt6-mcu/dp/SC13709?CMP=CPC-PLA

Which seems to have an ST-LINK v2 built in JTAG interface which Crossworks seems to support.

If you can’t afford that, then something like this might be better:

http://www.freertos.org/FreeRTOS-for-Cortex-M0-LPC1114-LPCXpresso.html

And there might well be other boards with built-in JTAG interfaces.

I have had NXP Expresso running on Linux. It is, sadly, Eclpise, but should work for you and give you proper debugging. It is a dog compared to Crossworks, but it does, basically, work. Also, I think the NXP Expresso boards [usually] have debug interfaces built into them, so you don’t have to shell out for a JTAG interface.

I have had Microchip’s MP-LAB X running on Linux as well and there seem to be projects for that. Again, it’s Eclipse and therefore a dog, but it does work.

If you can possibly afford it, I cannot recommend Crossworks and a proper JTAG interface highly enough. That set-up is really fast, really easy to use, very flexible and you don’t have to use Windows. It saves so much time and effort compared with messing around trying to get Arduino working or waiting for Eclipse-based programs to do something.

I appreciate you simply might not be able to afford $350 or so to buy a system that just works, in which case I can’t really help other than what is above. Using Windows opens you up to a whole host of other possiblities in terms of free (as in beer) IDEs; for example Atmel Studio (which is also a dog) and has a few FreeRTOS projects available.